Service-Learning April Digest

While educators and students wrap up school year service-learning projects across the country, NYLC staff hit the road this past month, traveling to service-learning hot spots as far flung as Japan and Turkey. Read about these staffer’s discoveries of Japan’s historic emphasis on peace education since WWII, and Turkey’s interests in supporting Somali-Americans in Minnesota.

April brings not only rainfall (or record snows if you live in Minnesota), but also:

  • Recently, the Child Development Center at Davidson County Community College in Lexington, N.C. raised nearly $3,000 through a  “Trike-A-Thon.” Forty-five childcare and preschool students circled a track on the sidewalk of the playground as parents and teachers cheered. The event teaches childcare and preschool students tricycle and riding safety while raising money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Proceeds benefit research and treatment for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases.
  • In Seattle, Wash., the Youth Ambassadors Program, sponsored by the Gates Foundation Discovery Center, is a year-long service learning program for high school students designed to educate, engage, and empower youth. Jahil Kirby, a high school junior, is learning about the music industry, and sharing his passions with others through the 2018 Teen Action Fair. He is also involved in a program called The Residency, which focuses on youth development through hip hop.
  • In Dallas Township, Pa., Misericordia University math education students celebrated “Math Day” with middle school student by mixing math and music with dance,  instructing their third grade charges to “Put the triangle in … take the triangle out” of the circle during a round of Hokey Pokey designed to help them differentiate between and count the sides of triangles, squares, and rectangles. Math Day is a service project for the Math Club, and the service-learning component of the Intro to Early Childhood Education and Math Methods I – courses teacher education majors take.
  • In Orlando, Fla.,, college student Clayton Kruse has been awarded the Actuality Media Documentary Outreach Scholarship to study the art and practice of filmmaking while producing a short documentary on a change-maker “making a sustainable impact on chronic social or environmental problems.” The film that secured him the scholarship was about the quiet ending of a recycling program at his college, Walla Walla University. Actuality Media is a service-learning organization that takes students and young professionals abroad to create short documentaries on changemakers in developing communities around the world. Find out more at www.actualitymedia.org
  • In northern Kentucky, elementary students have created a traveling wall that honors fallen veterans. Fifth-graders at Kelly Elementary in Burlington, Ky., have been  documenting local heroes, interviewing family members, and writing biographies. Community partners included a master carpenter, the local VFW, the American Legion, and a county-level grant. “It’s really worth it because we’re bringing back the memories of their loved ones,” said student Alexis.